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Water infrastructure and well-being among First Nations, Métis and Inuit individuals in Canada: What does the data tell us?

TitleWater infrastructure and well-being among First Nations, Métis and Inuit individuals in Canada: What does the data tell us?
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsO'Gorman, M., and Penner S.
JournalEnvironmental Science and Pollution Research
Volume25
Pages33038 - 33055
Keywordsfirst nations métis and inuit people, health, water and sanitation infrastructure
Abstract

This paper documents the association between water and sanitation infrastructure and health indicators in Canada for First Nations, Métis and Inuit individuals living on and off-reserve in Canada. We use two data sources: the Aboriginal Peoples Survey and a survey conducted in a First Nations community in northern Manitoba - St. Theresa Point First Nation. We find statistically significant relationships between water infrastructure and health status in both sources of data. In particular, among individuals living off-reserve, contaminated water is associated with a 5-7% lower likelihood of reporting good self-rated health and a 4% higher probability of reporting a health condition or stomach problem. Those in St. Theresa Point First Nation without running water are four times more likely to report an illness relative to those with running water. Off-reserve, this likely suggests a need for improved public education on the management of private water supplies and more frequent water testing. Our case study suggests that further investment in water/sanitation infrastructure and housing is needed in the community.

URLhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11356-018-1258-1
DOI10.1007/s11356-018-1258-1