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Vitamin D sufficiency of Canadian children did not improve following the 2010 revision of the dietary guidelines that recommended higher intake of vitamin D: An analysis of the Canadian Health Measures Survey

TitleVitamin D sufficiency of Canadian children did not improve following the 2010 revision of the dietary guidelines that recommended higher intake of vitamin D: An analysis of the Canadian Health Measures Survey
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsMunasinghe, L. L., Willows N. D., Yuan Y., Ekwaru J. Paul, and Veugelers P. J.
JournalNutrients
Volume9
Pages1 - 11
Keywords25(oh)d, canada, canadian health measure survey, children, déterminants, diet, dietary reference intake, sufficiency, supplementation, vitamin d
Abstract

In 2010, the dietary guidelines for vitamin D for Canadians and Americans aged 1-70 years were revised upward. It is unknown whether the vitamin D status of Canadian children improved after 2010. We compared the prevalence of vitamin D sufficiency (25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration of =>50 nmol/L), 25(OH)D concentration and the frequency of consuming vitamin D-rich foods among children aged 6-18 years-old using data from the nationally representative 2007/2009 and 2012/2013 Canadian Health Measures Surveys. Associations of sociodemographic, anthropometric, seasonal, and regional variables with achieving vitamin D sufficiency, 25(OH)D concentration, and consumption of vitamin D-rich foods were assessed using multiple logistic and linear regression models. 79% and 68% of children in 2007/2009 and 2012/2013 respectively, were vitamin D sufficient. The main dietary source of vitamin D was milk. Between 2007/2009 and 2012/2013, the frequency of milk and fish consumption declined, but egg and red meat consumption was unchanged. Age, income, weight status, season and ethnicity were associated with 25(OH)D concentration and vitamin D sufficiency. Vitamin D status declined after the upward revision of dietary guidelines for vitamin D, consequently, dietary intake was inadequate to meet sufficiency. Public health initiatives to promote vitamin D-rich foods and supplementation for Canadian children are needed.

URLhttp://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/9/9/945
DOI10.3390/nu9090945
Document URLhttp://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/9/9/945/pdf