You are here

Use of a Canadian population-based surveillance cohort to test relationships between shift work and breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer

TitleUse of a Canadian population-based surveillance cohort to test relationships between shift work and breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsM. Harris, A., MacLeod J., Kim J., Pahwa M., Tjepkema M., Peters P., and Demers P. A.
JournalAnnals of Work Exposures and Health
Volume64
Pages387 - 401
Keywordscancer epidemiology, retrospective exposure assessment, shift work, surveillance
Abstract

Objectives Shift work with circadian disruption is a suspected human carcinogen. Additional population-representative human studies are needed and large population-based linkage cohorts have been explored as an option for surveillance shift work and cancer risk. This study uses a surveillance linkage cohort and job-exposure matrix to test relationships. Methods We estimated associations between shift work and breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer using the population-based Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC), linking the 1991 Canadian census to national cancer registry and mortality databases. Prevalence estimates from population labour survey data were used to estimate and assign probability of night, rotating, or evening shifts by occupation and industry. Cohort members were assigned to high (>50%), medium (>25 to 50%), low (>5 to 25%), or no (

URLhttps://academic.oup.com/annweh/article-abstract/64/4/387/5788726
DOI10.1093/annweh/wxaa017
Document URLhttps://academic.oup.com/annweh/article-pdf/64/4/387/33147821/wxaa017.pdf