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Socioeconomic status and incidence of pediatric leukemia in Canada: 1992-2010

TitleSocioeconomic status and incidence of pediatric leukemia in Canada: 1992-2010
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsOlogbenla, A., Hu M., and Hajizadeh M.
JournalCancer Epidemiology
Volume61
Pages14 - 22
Keywordscanada, concentration index, inequalities, pediatric leukemia, socioeconomic status
Abstract

Highlights * Childhood leukemia incidence in Canada remained consistent over the study period. * Pediatric leukemia incidence had no significant association with household income. * Incidence of childhood leukemia was not significantly associated with education. * Policies should focus on mitigating risk factors that are independent of SES. Abstract Background Leukemia is the most common cancer among Canadian children, representing about a third of pediatric cancers in Canada and is responsible for about one-third of pediatric cancer deaths. Understanding the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on pediatric leukemia incidence provides valuable information for cancer control and interventions in Canada. Methods Using a linked data from the Canadian Cancer Registry (CCR), Canadian Census of Population (CCP) and National Household Survey (NHS) we aimed to quantify socioeconomic inequalities in the incidence of pediatric leukemia from 1992 to 2010. We used the concentration index (C) approach to quantify income- and education-related inequalities in the incidence of pediatric leukemia over time. Results Though there were fluctuations in incidence over the study period, our results showed that the total incidence of pediatric leukemia in Canada was generally consistent from 1992 to 2010. Incidence rate of 47 per 1,000,000 as at 1992 rose to 57 per 1,000,000 in 2010. The estimated values of the C over the study period failed to show any significant association between pediatric leukemia incidence and household income or education status. Conclusions Although pediatric leukemia incidence is not rising significantly, it is not reducing significantly either. The incidence of pediatric leukemia showed no significant association with socioeconomic status. Future cancer control interventions should focus more on mitigating risk factors that are independent of socioeconomic status.

URLhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1877782119300013
DOI10.1016/j.canep.2019.04.013