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Processes underlying children's adjustment in families characterized by physical aggression

TitleProcesses underlying children's adjustment in families characterized by physical aggression
Year of Publication2001
AuthorsOnyskiw, J.. E., and Hayduk L.. A.
JournalFamily Relations
Volume50
Pages376 - 385
Date PublishedOctober
Keywordschild adjustment, child development and behaviour, family relationships, family violence, internalizing behaviors, parenting behaviors, physical aggression, prosocial behaviors
Abstract

The hypothesis that physical aggression in the family affects children's adjustment through both observational learning/modeling and through its impact on parenting was tested (via LISREL) using data from a representative sample of Canadian children (N = 11,221). Results showed that observational learning and disrupted parenting provide reasonable, if only partial explanations, of mothers' assessments of children's adjustment in families characterized by physical aggression. Models for preschool (4-5 years), young (6-9 years), and older school-age (10-11 years) children fit acceptably and showed similar but weak effects. Children reported to witness more aggression also were reported to behave more aggressively. Mothers who reported being less warm and responsive in parenting reported that their children were more aggressive, had more internalizing behaviors, and had fewer prosocial behaviors.

URLhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3729.2001.00376.x/abstract
DOI10.1111/j.1741-3729.2001.00376.x
Document URLhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1741-3729.2001.00376.x/epdf