You are here

The prevalence of diagnosed obsessive compulsive disorder and associated comorbidities: A population-based Canadian study

TitleThe prevalence of diagnosed obsessive compulsive disorder and associated comorbidities: A population-based Canadian study
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsOsland, S., Arnold P. D., and Pringsheim T.
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume268
Pages137 - 142
Keywordsanxiety disorders, depression, epidemiology, health services, obsessive compulsive disorder, substance-related disorders
Abstract

The objective of this study was to provide epidemiological data regarding obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) in Canada, and examine related conditions, childhood experiences and healthcare utilization. A Statistics Canada population-based health survey was utilized (N = 25,097). The prevalence of diagnosed OCD in Canada was 0.93% (95% CI 0.75-1.11). People with OCD were younger and more likely to have lower incomes. They were more likely to have mood disorders including depression and bipolar disorder (both diagnosed conditions and by screening), and generalized anxiety disorder. The diagnosis of OCD was also associated with alcohol dependence and substance abuse and dependence. Negative childhood experiences were more common in people with OCD, with 72.33%(95% CI 62.25%-82.41%) of people with OCD having experienced some form of childhood maltreatment. Healthcare utilization was more frequent in people with OCD, but they were also more likely to desire help but feel as if they did not receive it. The higher proportion of people with OCD reporting not receiving the care they needed may reveal a crucial gap in treatment and available resources.

URLhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S016517811830444X