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Prevalence and predictors of unintended pregnancy among women: An analysis of the Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey

TitlePrevalence and predictors of unintended pregnancy among women: An analysis of the Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsOulman, E., Kim T. H. M., Yunis K., and Tamim H.
JournalBMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
Volume15
Pages1 - 8
Keywordsconception, maternal health, unintended pregnancy
Abstract

Background Unintended pregnancies (mistimed or unwanted during the time of conception) can result in adverse outcomes both to the mother and to her newborn. Further research on identifying the characteristics of unintended pregnant women who are at risk is warranted. The present study aims to examine the prevalence and predictors of unintended pregnancy among Canadian women. Methods The analysis was based on the 2006 Maternity Experiences Survey targeting women who were at least 15 years of age and who had a singleton live birth, between February 15, 2006 to May 15, 2006 in the Canadian provinces and November 1, 2005 to February 1, 2006 for women in the Canadian territories. The primary outcome was the mother's pregnancy intention, where unintended pregnancy was defined as women who wanted to become pregnant later or not at all. Sociodemographic, maternal and pregnancy related variables were considered for a multivariable logistic regression. Results Adjusted Odds Ratios (OR) and 95 % Confidence Intervals (95 % CI) were reported. Overall, the prevalence of unintended pregnancy among Canadian women was 27 %. The odds of experiencing an unintended pregnancy were statistically significantly increased if the mother was: under 20 years of age, immigrated to Canada, had an equivalent of a high school education or less, no partner, experienced violence or abuse and had 1 or more previous pregnancies. Additionally, mothers who reported smoking, drinking alcohol and using drugs prior to becoming pregnant, were all associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing an unintended pregnancy. Conclusion The study findings constitute the basis for future research into these associations to aid in developing effective policy changes and interventions to minimize the odds of experiencing an unintended pregnancy and its associated consequences.

URLhttp://bmcpregnancychildbirth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12884-015-0663-4
DOI10.1186/s12884-015-0663-4
Document URLhttp://bmcpregnancychildbirth.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s12884-015-0663-4?site=bmcpregnancychildbirth.biomedcentral.com
Publication Type
RDC
Surveys
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Publication language(s)
English