You are here

Pregnancy and intimate partner violence in Canada: A comparison of victims who were and were not abused during pregnancy

TitlePregnancy and intimate partner violence in Canada: A comparison of victims who were and were not abused during pregnancy
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsTaillieu, T. L., Brownridge D. A., Tyler K. A., Chan K. Ling, Tiwari A., and Santos S. C.
JournalJournal of Family Violence
Volume31
Pages567 - 579
Date PublishedJuly
Keywordshealth effects, intimate partner violence, pregnancy, risk factors, severity
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine risk factors, indicators of severity, and differences in post-violence health effects for victims who experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy compared to victims who experienced IPV outside the pregnancy period. Data were from Statistics Canada's 2009 General Social Survey. Among IPV victims, 10.5 % experienced physical and/or sexual violence during pregnancy. Victims who had experienced violence during pregnancy were more likely than victims who were not abused during pregnancy to experience both less severe and more severe forms of violence. In fully adjusted models, younger age, separated or divorced marital status, as well as partners' patriarchal domination, destruction of property, and drinking were significant predictors of pregnancy violence. Measures indicative of more severe violence and of a number of adverse post-violence health effects were significantly elevated among victims who experienced pregnancy violence relative to victims who were not abused during pregnancy. Implications of these findings are discussed.

URLhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10896-015-9789-4
DOI10.1007/s10896-015-9789-4
Publication Type
RDC
Surveys
Themes
Contract ID
Publication language(s)
English