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Perceived health status of Francophones and Anglophones in an officially bilingual Canadian province

TitlePerceived health status of Francophones and Anglophones in an officially bilingual Canadian province
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsBélanger, M., Bouchard L., Gaboury I., Sonier B., Gagnon-Arpin I., Schofield A., and Bourque P-E.
JournalCanadian Journal of Public Health
Volume102
Pages122 -126
Keywordsdisparity, language, minority, self-perceived health
Abstract

Objective: It has been reported that being part of a minority group may be negatively associated with self-perceived health. The objective of this analysis was to determine whether there are differences in perceived health between the Francophone minority and Anglophone majority in New Brunswick, the only officially bilingual province in Canada. Methods: Data from the first four primary cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey (2001 to 2007) were obtained for 17,729 New Brunswick residents. Odds of reporting good health among Francophones and Anglophones were compared using multivariate logistic regressions accounting for age, health-related behaviours, socio-demographic variables, and medical conditions. Results: In the final models, Francophone men and women were less likely than Anglophones to report their health as being good, although these differences were not statistically significant (Odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 0.88, 0.61-1.26; 0.71, 0.49-1.04, in men and women, respectively). Conclusion: This study suggests that being part of the linguistic minority in New Brunswick is not associated with statistically significant differences in self-perceived health.

URLhttp://journal.cpha.ca/index.php/cjph/article/view/2307
Document URLhttp://journal.cpha.ca/index.php/cjph/article/view/2307/2354