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Medical conditions, medication use, and their relationship with subsequent motor vehicle injuries: examination of the Canadian National Population Health Survey

TitleMedical conditions, medication use, and their relationship with subsequent motor vehicle injuries: examination of the Canadian National Population Health Survey
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsVingilis, E., and Wilk P.
JournalTraffic Injury Prevention
Volume13
Pages327 - 336
Keywordscanada, medical conditions, medication use, motor vehicle injuries
Abstract

Purpose: To examine the effects of various medical conditions and medications on subsequent motor vehicle injuries (MVIs). Method: The National Population Health Survey, a large, nationally representative, longitudinal study of Canadians, included self-reported medical conditions of asthma, arthritis/rheumatism, back problems excluding arthritis, high blood pressure, migraine headaches, diabetes, heart disease and distress, and medication use during the past month for asthma, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart, codeine/pethidine (Demerol)/morphine, other pain relievers, antidepressants, tranquilizers, and sleeping medication. Path analyses were used to examine the odds of subsequent MVI for different medical conditions and medication use reported prior to the MVI (in the previous wave of the survey) while controlling for age and sex. Results: Increased odds of subsequent MVIs were found for asthma (odds ratio [OR]: 1.864, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.281, 2.713), arthritis/rheumatism (OR: 1.659, 95% CI: 1.163, 2.365), back problems (OR: 2.169, 95% CI: 1.624, 2.895), and migraines (OR: 1.631, 95% CI: 1.125, 2.364) but not for high blood pressure (OR: 1.435, 95% CI: 0.944, 2.181), diabetes (OR: 1.479, 95% CI: 0.743, 2.944), heart disease (OR: 2.627, 95% CI: 0.941, 7.334) or distress (OR: 1.153, 95% CI: 0.840, 1.581). Except for migraine with codeine/pethidine/morphine, this effect persisted regardless of whether medication was used to treat the condition. Respondents who reported using certain medications, namely, codeine/pethidine/morphine (OR: 2.215, 95% CI: 1.274, 3.850), other pain medication (OR: 1.630, 95% CI: 1.242, 2.139), antidepressants (OR: 2.664. 95% CI: 1.602, 4.429), and sleeping medication (OR: 2.059, 95% CI: 1.161, 3.651), had increased odds of subsequent MVI, independent of related medical condition, whereas tranquillizers showed no increased odds of subsequent MVIs. Conclusions: This study suggests that the relationship between medical conditions, medications, and MVIs is complex but consistent with other studies.

URLhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15389588.2012.654411
DOI10.1080/15389588.2012.654411
Document URLhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/15389588.2012.654411