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The longitudinal effects of neighborhood social and material deprivation change on psychological distress in urban, community-dwelling Canadian adults

TitleThe longitudinal effects of neighborhood social and material deprivation change on psychological distress in urban, community-dwelling Canadian adults
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsBlair, A., Gariepy G., and Schmitz N.
JournalPublic Health
Volume129
Pages932 - 940
Keywordsdeprivation, distress, longitudinal, mental health, neighbourhood
Abstract

Objective The purpose of this study was to assess how longitudinal changes in neighbourhood material and social deprivation affect distress outcomes in adult Canadians. Study design This study used a prospective cohort approach. Methods We paired data from 2745 urban participants of Canada's National Population Health Survey-who completed the Kessler 6-Item psychological distress screening tool at baseline and follow-up-with neighbourhood social and material deprivation data from the census-based Pampalon Deprivation Index. Data were paired using participants' postal code. We conducted multiple linear regression models, which were stratified by baseline deprivation level and controlled for key confounders. Results Most participants lived in neighbourhoods that did not change drastically in social or material deprivation level during the six years between baseline and follow-up. We found that a worsening of material settings was significantly associated with worsening distress scores at follow-up. This finding is discussed in the context of existing literature, and made relevant for urban health research and policy.

URLhttp://www.publichealthjrnl.com/article/S0033-3506(15)00209-7/abstract
DOI10.1016/j.puhe.2015.05.011
Document URLhttp://www.publichealthjrnl.com/article/S0033-3506(15)00209-7/pdf