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Life interference due to gambling in three Canadian provinces

TitleLife interference due to gambling in three Canadian provinces
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsAfifi, T. O., Sareen J., Taillieu T., Turner S., and Fortier J.
JournalJournal of Gambling Studies
Volume35
Pages671 - 687
Keywordsfamily history of gambling, interference, problem gambling, provinces, video lottery terminals (vlts)
Abstract

The gambling landscape among provinces in Canada is diverse. Yet, few studies have investigated provincial differences related to life interference due to gambling. The objectives of the current study were to examine: (1) provincial differences with regard to gambling types and (2) if gender, family history of gambling, and alcohol or drug use while gambling were related to an increased likelihood of life interference in three Canadian provinces. Data were drawn from the 2013 and 2014 cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey from Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia (n=30,150). Analyses were conducted stratified by provinces and also combined using logistic regression models. Provincial differences were noted with individuals from British Columbia compared to Manitoba being less likely to play VLTs outside of casinos, play live horse racing at a track or off track, and participate in sports gambling. Those in Saskatchewan compared to Manitoba were more likely to play VLTs inside a casino. When examining all provinces combined, family history of gambling was associated with increased odds of life interference. Gender was not associated with life interference. Provincial differences were noted, which may be in part related to differences in gambling landscapes. Family history of gambling may have clinical relevance for understanding which individuals may be more likely to experience life interference due to gambling. Further research is needed to clarify the link between alcohol and drug use while gambling and life interference due to gambling as the models in the current research were likely underpowered.

URLhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10899-018-9771-1
DOI10.1007/s10899-018-9771-1