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Lack of government-insured annual routine eye examinations increases the risk of vision problems amongst low-income elderly

TitleLack of government-insured annual routine eye examinations increases the risk of vision problems amongst low-income elderly
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsJin, Y-P., Buys Y. M., Xiong J.., and Trope G. E.
Abstract

In Canada government coverage of routine eye examinations differs from province to province. We assessed whether lack of government-insured annual routine eye examinations resulted in reduced vision health status amongst elderly Caucasian Canadians. The prevalence of non refractive vision problems (i.e. unable to see close or distance when wearing glasses or contact lenses) between Canadians with and without government-insured annual eye examinations was compared. Data was derived from respondents aged 65 years or older in the Canadian Community Health Survey 2000/2001. Our results show that uninsured Caucasians had a greater prevalence of vision problems than insured Caucasians, if their household income s were under the mid level; the prevalence was similar between the insured and uninsured in higher income households. Compared to seniors in the mid to high income and living in insured provinces, Caucasians residing in provinces with no insurance had a 50 percent higher odds of reporting vision problems if their income was under the mid level, but a 30 percent lower likelihood of having vision problems if their income was in the mid level or higher. In addition, the mean age at diagnosis of glaucoma and cataracts was about 2 years older for uninsured versus insured Caucasians.

URLhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nkv6y0P_o-c
Document URLhttps://crdcn.org/sites/default/files/jin.pptx