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Job changing and internal mobility: Insights into the “declining duo” from Canadian administrative data

TitleJob changing and internal mobility: Insights into the “declining duo” from Canadian administrative data
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsHaan, M., and Cardoso M.
JournalPopulation, Space and Place
Volume26
Keywordsinternal migration, job switching, mover's premium
Abstract

Considerable research focuses on why internal migration rates are declining across most of the Western world. Several studies also look at why people are less likely to change jobs than they were in the past. In this paper, we look at the prospect of declining economic returns as an explanation for the joint decline in both phenomena in Canada. We use the Canadian Employer-Employee Dynamics Database, a linked job–individual–family–firm data set, to look at the 5-year income trajectories for Canadian workers who changed job and province of residence (movers) in 1997, 2002, and 2007. We compare these returns with those of job switchers who did not move (nonmover job switchers) and with those that changed neither jobs nor province (nonmover nonjob switchers). We find that the mover's premium, defined as the increase in income that accompanies either a job change or a geographical move, has decreased over time and argue that this may help explain why internal migration and labour fluidity have been declining.

URLhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/psp.2324
DOI10.1002/psp.2324
Document URLhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/psp.2324