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Immigrants' experiences of everyday discrimination in Canada: Unpacking the contributions of assimilation, race, and early socialization

TitleImmigrants' experiences of everyday discrimination in Canada: Unpacking the contributions of assimilation, race, and early socialization
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsVang, Z. M., and Chang Y.
JournalInternational Migration Review
Volume53
Pages602 - 631
Abstract

We examined perceptions of everyday discrimination among immigrants in Canada and in comparison to native-born Canadians using data from the 2013 Canadian Community Health Survey. We find that recent immigrants report less discrimination than native-born Canadians, ceteris paribus. Recent immigrants also report less discrimination than their fellow immigrants who had been residing in Canada for much longer durations. There were trivial differences in perceptions of everyday discrimination between native-born Canadians and midway and established immigrants, all else being equal. Additional analysis suggests that differences in age at arrival and associated early socialization experiences might explain variations in immigrants’ perceived discrimination. NOTE: There is a correction to this article, here: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0197918318787194

URLhttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/01979183187871940197918318764871
Document URLhttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/0197918318764871https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0197918318787194