You are here

Immigrant category, social networks, and ethnic workplaces over time: A longitudinal analysis of immigrants' economic integration in Canada

TitleImmigrant category, social networks, and ethnic workplaces over time: A longitudinal analysis of immigrants' economic integration in Canada
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsRoth, W. D., Seidel M-D. L., Ma D., and Lo E.
JournalMetropolis British Columbia Working Paper Series
Abstract

The economic benefits to immigrants of taking jobs in ethnic workplaces, relative to the open economy, are heavily debated. We examine longitudinally how the choice of ethnic or non-ethnic workplace influences the ethnic composition of social networks, how these factors impact immigrants' economic success, and how these patterns differ across immigrant categories. We analyze the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada, with data 6 months, 2 years, and 4 years after arrival, and find immigrant category differences in routes to economic success. While economic immigrants benefit from non-ethnic workplaces, family immigrants face economic penalties when they enter the open economy, and only refugees benefit from entrepreneurship. Immigration policies sort immigrants into different labour market trajectories with different financial returns.

Document URLhttp://mbc.metropolis.net/assets/uploads/files/wp/2011/wp11-10.pdf