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How does immigration class affect immigrants' experiences with credential recognition?

TitleHow does immigration class affect immigrants' experiences with credential recognition?
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsZikic, J., Damsbaek N., Phan M., Kelly P., Lemoine M., Fang T., Preston V., and Tufts S.
Series TitleTIEDI Analytical Report
Document Number10
Pages1 - 12
Date PublishedJune
InstitutionToronto Immigrant Employment Data Initiative
CityToronto, ON
Abstract

KEY POINTS: * Skilled immigrants are most likely to check if their credentials are recognized, either before or after arrival. Refugees experience the most difficulty in having their credentials accepted. * Immigrant men are more likely to have applied to have their credentials recognized than immigrant women * The two most common reasons immigrants gave for not checking their credentials was lack of time or the fact that it was not necessary. Principal applicants and business class immigrants are more likely than other groups to report that it was not necessary to check, while family class immigrants were most likely to have no time. * Refugees are more likely than other groups to say that they cannot afford to have their credentials recognized * Principal applicants under the skilled immigrant class have the highest levels of credential recognition. * Refugees and business immigrants tend to have the lowest levels of credential recognition of all groups. * Female refugees have the lowest percentages of credential recognition at every level of education.

URLhttp://www.yorku.ca/tiedi/pubreports10.html
Document URLhttp://www.yorku.ca/tiedi/doc/AnalyticalReport10.pdf