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Geographic variation in work injuries: a multilevel analysis of individual-level data and area-level factors within Canada

TitleGeographic variation in work injuries: a multilevel analysis of individual-level data and area-level factors within Canada
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsMorassaei, S., F. Breslin C., Ibrahim S. A., Smith P. M., Mustard C. A., Amick B. C., Shankardass K., and Petch J.
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
Volume23
Pages260 - 266
Keywordscanada, geographic factors, multilevel analysis, occupational injuries
Abstract

Purpose This study sought to examine provincial variation in work injuries and to assess whether contextual factors are associated with geographic variation in work injuries. Methods Individual-level data from the 2003 and 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey was obtained for a representative sample of 89,541 Canadians aged 15 to 75 years old who reported working in the past 12 months. A multilevel regression model was conducted to identify geographic variation and contextual factors associated with the likelihood of reporting a medically attended work injury, while adjusting for demographic and work variables. Results Provincial differences in work injuries were observed, even after controlling for other risk factors. Workers in western provinces such as Saskatchewan (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.55), Alberta (AOR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.13-1.51), and British Columbia (AOR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.26-1.71) had a higher risk of work injuries compared with Ontario workers. Indicators of area-level material and social deprivation were not associated with work injury risk. Conclusions Provincial differences in work injuries suggest that broader factors acting as determinants of work injuries are operating across workplaces at a provincial level. Future research needs to identify the provincial determinants and whether similar large area-level factors are driving work injuries in other countries.

URLhttp://www.annalsofepidemiology.org/article/s1047-2797%2813%2900065-3/abstract
DOI10.1016/j.annepidem.2013.03.008
Document URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/s1047279713000653