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The tide does turn: Predictors of remission from suicidal ideation and attempt among Canadians who previously attempted suicide

TitreThe tide does turn: Predictors of remission from suicidal ideation and attempt among Canadians who previously attempted suicide
Année de publication2019
AuteursFuller-Thomson, E., West K. J., and Baiden P.
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume274
Pages313 - 321
Mots-clésremission, suicidal ideation, suicide attempt
Résumé

Highlights * Seven in eight former suicide attempters had no suicide attempt in the past year. * 69% of former suicide attempters had no suicidal ideation in the past year. * Higher odds of remission with older age, female sex, no sleep problems or depression. * Women had about 2.7 times higher odds than men of remission from suicide attempt and ideation. Abstract The objectives of this study were to identify factors that contribute to (1) remission from suicidal ideation, and (2) remission from suicide attempt, among Canadians with a lifetime history of suicide attempt. Data for this study came from Statistics Canada's nationally representative 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health. A sample of 769 adult respondents who had ever attempted suicide was analyzed with remission from past year suicidal ideation and remission from past year suicide attempt as outcome variables. Of the 769 respondents who had ever attempted suicide, more than two-thirds (69%) were free from suicidal ideation within the past year, and approximately 87% were free from suicide attempts within the past year. Compared to men, odds were 2.66 times greater for women to be free of suicide attempt and 2.65 times greater to be free of suicidal ideation in the past year. Older age, being free of sleep problems and major depressive episode, having no history of chronic childhood physical abuse, and having two or fewer previous suicide attempts were associated with higher odds of remission from both suicide attempt and ideation in the past year.

URLhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165178118310886
DOI10.1016/j.psychres.2019.02.030