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Parents' level of education and their adult children's risk of experiencing major depression

TitreParents' level of education and their adult children's risk of experiencing major depression
Année de publication2013
AuteursQuesnel-Vallée, A.
Résumé

Depression in early adulthood strikes at a critical time. An individual may be pursuing studies or apprenticeships, or starting a career or a family. A disruption caused by depression can potentially derail these events and have lifelong consequences. In this webinar, Dr. Quesnel-Vallée will review the findings of a recent study - the first in Canada – examining the impact of mother's and father's education on depression in early adulthood. The study employs a sample of 1,267 participants from Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey. The respondents were first interviewed in 1994, when they were between 12 and 24 years old, and living with their parents. They were then followed for 12 years, and their risk of major depressive episode was assessed when they were between 22 and 36 years old. One of the most striking conclusions is that children of women who did not finish high school were twice as likely to experience a major episode of depression in early adulthood as children whose mothers obtained a high school diploma.

URLhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDlmUg2ee5I