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Naturally occurring workplace facilities to increase the leisure time physical activity of workers: a propensity-score weighted population study

TitreNaturally occurring workplace facilities to increase the leisure time physical activity of workers: a propensity-score weighted population study
Année de publication2018
AuteursBiswas, A., Smith P. M., and Gignac M. A. M.
JournalPreventive Medicine Reports
Volume10
Pages263 - 270
Mots-clésbuilt environment, exercise, health promotion, physical activity, workplace
Résumé

The benefit of providing access to physical activity facilities at or near work to support the leisure time physical activity (LTPA) of workers is uncertain. We examined the association between access to physical activity facilities at or near work and the LTPA of workers after adjusting for a range of individual and occupational characteristics. Data was obtained from 60,650 respondents to the 2007–2008 Canadian Community Health Survey. Participants were employed adults =>18 years of age who had no long-term health condition which reduced their participation in physical activity. Latent class analysis determined naturally occurring combinations of physical activity facilities at or near work. Each combination was balanced by 19 individual and occupational covariate characteristics using inverse probability of treatment weights derived from propensity scores. The association between combinations of physical activity facilities at or near work on LTPA level was estimated by multinomial logistic regression. Five different combinations of physical activity facilities were available to respondents at or near work. Data were analyzed in 2017. All possible physical facilities increased the likelihood for LTPA (OR, 2.08, 95% CI, 1.03–4.20) and other combinations were also positively associated. Respondents with no physical activity facilities were characterized as having a low education, low income, high physically demanding work, poor health and mental health, non-white racial background, and being an immigrant. Access to supportive workplace environments can help workers be physically active. Future research should assess a range of personal, social and environmental factors that may be driving this relationship.

URLhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211335518300512
DOI10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.03.013
Document URLhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.03.013