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Assessing the impacts of minimum legal drinking age laws on police-reported violent victimization in Canada from 2009 to 2013

TitreAssessing the impacts of minimum legal drinking age laws on police-reported violent victimization in Canada from 2009 to 2013
Année de publication2019
AuteursBenny, C., Gatley J. M., Sanches M., and Callaghan R. C.
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume197
Pages65 - 72
Mots-clésalcohol, minimum legal drinking age, regression-discontinuity, victimization
Résumé

{Background/aim: Given that alcohol-related victimization is highly prevalent among young adults, the current study aimed to assess the potential impacts of Minimum Legal Drinking Age (MLDA) laws on police-reported violent victimization events among young people. Design: A regression-discontinuity (RD) approach was applied to victimization data from the Canadian Uniform Crime Reporting 2 (UCR2) Incident-based survey from 2009-2013. Participants/cases: All police-reported violent victimization events (females: n = 178,566; males: n = 156,803) among youth aged 14-22 years in Canada. Measurements: Violent victimization events, primarily consisting of homicide, physical assault, sexual assault, and robbery. Results: In comparison to youth slightly younger than the drinking age, both males and females slightly older than MLDA had significant and immediate increases in police-reported violent victimization events (females: 13.5%, 95% CI: 7.5%-19.5%, p

URLhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376871619300407
DOI10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.12.025
Document URLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/30780068/