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Factors associated with heavy drinking among off-reserve First Nations and Métis youth and adults: Evidence from the 2012 Canadian Aboriginal Peoples Survey

TitleFactors associated with heavy drinking among off-reserve First Nations and Métis youth and adults: Evidence from the 2012 Canadian Aboriginal Peoples Survey
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsRyan, C. J., Cooke M. J., and Leatherdale S. T.
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume87
Pages95 - 102
Date PublishedJune
Keywordsadolescent, adult, alcohol consumption, binge drinking, canada, indigenous population, youth
Abstract

Objective Aboriginal people in Canada are at higher risk to heavy alcohol consumption than are other Canadians. The objective of this study was to examine a set of culturally specific correlates of heavy drinking among First Nations and Métis youth and adults. Methods Demographic, geographic, socioeconomic and health-related variables were also considered. Data were used from Statistics Canada's 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey to predict heavy drinking among 14,410 First Nations and Métis 15 years of age and older. Separate sets of binary sequential logistic regression models were estimated for youth and adults. Results Among youth, those who had hunted, fished or trapped within the last year were more likely to be heavy drinkers. In addition, current smokers and those who most frequently participated in sports were at higher odds of heavy alcohol consumption. Among adults, respondents who had hunted, fished or trapped within the last year were more likely to drink heavily. On the other hand, those who had made traditional arts or crafts within the last year were less likely to drink heavily. Conclusions Men, younger adults, smokers, those who were unmarried, those who had higher household incomes, and those who had higher ratings of self-perceived health were more likely to be heavy drinkers. Efforts aimed at reducing the prevalence of heavy drinking among this population may benefit from considering culturally specific factors, in addition to demographic variables and co-occurring health-risk behaviors.

URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/s0091743516000475
DOI10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.02.008
Document URLhttp://bit.ly/2eV9Kbx