You are here

An evaluation of tobacco control strategies on smoking-related outcomes in Canada during the time of the federal tobacco control strategy

TitleAn evaluation of tobacco control strategies on smoking-related outcomes in Canada during the time of the federal tobacco control strategy
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsManivong, P.
UniversityMcGill University
CityMontréal, QC
Abstract

Background: Various tobacco control laws and strategies have been implemented in Canada since the 1980s. Excise tobacco taxes are a common form of tobacco control, and tax levels in Canada have been gradually increasing since the 1980s. More recently, the Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) was launched in 2001 as a planned 10-year initiative by Health Canada (HC), in partnership with Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) and other agencies. We can summarize the FTCS goals as the following: (i) prevention of smoking among youths, (ii) cessation and reduction of consumption among smokers, and (iii) protection of non-smokers from environmental tobacco smoke. Although both smoking prevalence and smoking frequency have declined during the time of the FTCS, the contributions of the various tobacco control strategies in effect in achieving FTCS goals are unclear. Moreover, there exists a socioeconomic gap in smoking among the adult population, and it is also unclear what impact tobacco control strategies operating during the time of the FTCS have had on this gap.Objectives: The three studies of my PhD dissertation are motivated by the set of Federal Tobacco Control Strategy (FTCS) goals and the socioeconomic inequality in smoking. The first one evaluated the effectiveness of cigarette taxes as a tool for the prevention of smoking and the development of a habit among youths. The second study assessed the effectiveness of cigarette taxes in facilitating smoking cessation, and reducing smoking frequency among adults. The third study evaluated the protective effect of smoke-free legislation, but assessed smoking prevalence and frequency on the adult Canadian population. The second and third studies also included an evaluation of the potential differential effects by education. Results: For our analyses, we used the Canadian Tobacco Usage Monitoring Survey 2002-2012 database and exploited the variation in excise cigarette tax levels and implementation of smoke-free legislation among the provinces. We used regression models with province and year fixed effects, individual-level covariates, and provincial-level covariates. For Research Objective 1, changes in excise cigarette taxes yielded negligible contributions to the reduction in smoking behaviour among youths. For an increase of $1.00 in excise cigarette taxes per package of 20, the marginal effect was 0.2 (95% CI: -1.8, 2.2) percentage points for smoking prevalence, and 0.3 (95% CI: -1.2, 1.8) cigarettes for smoking frequency (past-week). We obtained similar results for the average effect of taxes on smoking behaviour among adults for Research Objective 2. For an increase of $1.00 in excise cigarette taxes per package of 20, the marginal effect was -0.1 (95% CI: -1.7, 1.5) percentage points for smoking prevalence, and -0.1 (95% CI: -1.9, 1.7) cigarettes (per week) for smoking frequency. We continued to derive null results when assessing the impact of excise cigarette taxes by education for both smoking outcomes.Likewise, for Research Objective 3, provincial smoke-free legislation (PSFL) had little impact on smoking behaviour among adults. The marginal average effect for smoking prevalence was 0.1 (95% CI: -1.3, 1.4) percentage points. The marginal average effect for smoking frequency was -0.6 (95% CI: -2.2, 1.0) cigarettes. Again, we derived null results when assessing the impact of PSFL by education for both smoking outcomes. Conclusions: From 2002-2012, both smoking prevalence and mean smoking frequency have been in steady decline in Canada. These declines, however, are present even in provinces with stable or decreasing cigarette tax levels and for provinces which implement smoke-free legislation at a later time, suggesting that other factors common to all provinces such as growing anti-smoking sentiment have had a greater influence over tobacco use. /// Les Objectifs: Les trois études de ma thèse de doctorat sont motivées par l'ensemble des objectifs de la SFLT et par les inégalités socio-économiques en matière du tabagisme. La première étude a évalué l'efficacité des taxes sur les cigarettes comme outil pour la prévention du tabagisme, ainsi que comme outil pour la prévention du développement d'habitudes tabagiques chez les jeunes. La deuxième étude a évalué l'efficacité des taxes sur les cigarettes pour faciliter le sevrage tabagique et réduire la fréquence du tabagisme chez les adultes. La troisième étude a évalué l'effet protecteur de la législation antitabac sur la prévalence du tabagisme et la fréquence de la consommation du tabac sur la population adulte canadienne. Les deuxième et troisième études comprenaient également une évaluation de l'impact potentiel sur les écarts du tabagisme par niveau d'éducation Résultats: Pour nos analyses nous avons utilisé la base de donnes de L'Enquête de surveillance de l'usage du tabac au Canada (ESUTC), pour les années 2002 à 2012. Nous avons aussi exploité la variation des niveaux de la taxe d'accise sur les cigarettes pendant cette période et la mise en œuvre de la législation antitabac par les provinces. Nous avons utilisé des modèles de régression avec des effets fixes pour chaque province, des variables de niveau individuel et des variables de niveau provincial.Pour la recherche de l'objectif de la première étude, les changements dans les taxes d'accise sur les cigarettes ont donné des contributions négligeables à la réduction de l'usage du tabac chez les jeunes. Avec une augmentation de 1,00 $ en taxes d'accise sur un paquet de 20 cigarettes, l'effet marginal était de 0,2 (IC 95%: -1,8, 2,2) points de pourcentage pour la prévalence du tabagisme, et de 0,3 (IC 95%: -1,2, 1,8) cigarettes fumées dans la dernière semaine. Nous avons obtenu des résultats similaires pour l'effet moyen des impôts sur le tabagisme chez les adultes pour l'objectif de la deuxième étude. Avec une augmentation de 1,00 $ en taxes d'accise sur un paquet de 20 cigarettes, l'effet marginal était de -0,1 (IC 95%: -1,7 1,5) points de pourcentage pour la prévalence du tabagisme, et de -0,1 (IC à 95%: -1.9, 1.7) cigarettes fumées, pour la fréquence de consommation. Nous avons aussi tiré des résultats nuls lors de l'évaluation de l'impact des taxes d'accise sur les cigarettes en rapport avec chaque niveau d'éducation, et ce pour l'effet sur la prévalence du tabagisme et la fréquence de consommation du tabac. De même pour l'objectif de la troisième étude, la législation antitabac provinciale a eu peu d'impact sur le tabagisme chez les adultes. L'estimation de l'effet moyen marginal de la prévalence du tabagisme était de 0,1 (IC 95% : -1.3, 1,4) points de pourcentage. L'effet moyen marginal pour la consommation du tabac était de -0,6 (IC 95%: -2,2, 1,0) cigarettes. Encore une fois, nous avons tiré des résultats nuls lors de l'évaluation de l'impact de la législation antitabac provinciale en rapport avec chaque niveau d'éducation, et ce pour l'effet sur la prévalence du tabagisme et la fréquence de consommation du tabac. Conclusions: De 2002 à 2012, la prévalence du tabagisme et la moyenne de la fréquence de la consumation du tabac ont été en baisse constante au Canada. Ces baisses, cependant, sont présents même dans les provinces où les niveaux d'imposition des cigarettes sont stable ou en baisse, ainsi que pour les provinces qui ont mise en place de la législation antitabac plus tard que d'autres. Cela suggéré que d'autres facteurs communs dans toutes les provinces, telle que un sentiment anti-tabac florissant, ont eu une plus grande influence sur la consommation du tabac.

URLhttp://digitool.Library.McGill.CA:80/R/-?func=dbin-jump-full&object_id=141366&silo_library=GEN01
Document URLhttp://digitool.library.mcgill.ca/webclient/DeliveryManager?pid=141366&custom_att_2=direct
Publication Type
RDC
Surveys
Themes
Contract ID
Publication language(s)
English