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Do changes in job control predict differences in health status? Results from a longitudinal national survey of Canadians

TitleDo changes in job control predict differences in health status? Results from a longitudinal national survey of Canadians
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsSmith, P.., Frank J.., Bondy S.., and Mustard C.. A.
JournalPsychosomatic Medicine
Volume70
Pages85 - 91
Abstract

Objective To examine the effect of changes in job control on health behaviors, psychological distress and health status. Methods Using a path analysis model, we examined the effects of change in job control over a 4-year period on levels of physical activity, smoking, and psychological distress; and on self-rated health over an additional 2 years, among a representative sample of 2221 Canadians. Results Over the 4-year period, 280 respondents reported decreases in job control, and 256 reported increases in job control. Health at baseline was not associated with the likelihood of changes in job control. We found a graded relationship between change in job control and levels of physical activity and psychological distress over a 4-year period; and levels of self-rated health over a 6-year period, with positive change in job control associated in higher levels of physical activity and self-rated health and lower levels of distress. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that both level of job control and changes in job control have direct and indirect effects on health status over time. Future research should focus on developing precise measures of work exposures, and examine differences between changes in job control due to only changes in perceptions and changes due to work redesign. Key words: job control, change, longitudinal, self-rated health, working population.

URLhttp://www.psychosomaticmedicine.org/cgi/content/abstract/70/1/85
Document URLhttp://www.psychosomaticmedicine.org/cgi/reprint/70/1/85http://www.psychosomaticmedicine.org/cgi/content/full/70/1/85