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Disability and workplace harassment and discrimination among Canadian federal public service employees

TitleDisability and workplace harassment and discrimination among Canadian federal public service employees
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsJones, A. M., Finkelstein R., and Koehoorn M.
JournalCanadian Journal of Public Health
Volume109
Pages79 - 88
Keywordsage groups, disabled persons, ethnic groups, gender, social discrimination, workplace
Abstract

Objectives Policy and legislation that prohibits workplace harassment and discrimination, including that which is disability related, has been in place in Canada for many years. The study objective was to examine associations between disability and workplace harassment and discrimination in the current Canadian context, as well as the intersection of disability with age, gender, and ethnicity. Methods Cross-sectional data from the 2014 Canadian Public Service Employee Survey was analyzed (n=175,742) using logistic regression to investigate the relationship between self-reported disability and workplace harassment and discrimination in the last 2 years. Age, gender, and ethnicity were included as potential confounders and effect modifiers. Additive and multiplicative effect modifications were examined using linear binomial and logistic regression, respectively. Results Overall, 18 and 8% of the sample of Canadian public service employees reported workplace harassment and discrimination, respectively. The prevalence was higher for workers with disability (37 and 26%). Disability was significantly associated with an increased odds of harassment (odds ratio (OR)=2.80; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.68–2.92) and discrimination (OR=4.97; 95% CI, 4.72–5.23) in models adjusted for confounders. Significant positive additive effect modification was observed for (1) age in the harassment and discrimination models and (2) ethnicity in the discrimination model. Conclusion Findings from a 2014 census of the Canadian federal public service suggest that additional efforts are needed to address workplace harassment and discrimination beyond those already in place. Consideration should be given to workers with disability, as well as the intersectional impacts for older workers, visible minorities, and Aboriginal peoples.

URLhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.17269%2Fs41997-018-0022-0
DOI10.17269/s41997-018-0022-0