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Cross-associations between physical activity and sedentary time on metabolic health: a comparative assessment using self-reported and objectively measured activity

TitleCross-associations between physical activity and sedentary time on metabolic health: a comparative assessment using self-reported and objectively measured activity
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsThakkar, N., Jamnik V., and Ardern C. I.
JournalJournal of Public Health
Volume40
Pagese464 - e473
Keywordsepidemiology, measurement, physical activity, sedentary time
Abstract

Purpose Physical activity and sedentary time have distinct physiologic and metabolic effects, but little is known about their joint associations. Methods The Canadian Health Measures Survey (n = 5950) was used to (i) examine the joint relationship between active/non-sedentary (referent group), active/sedentary, inactive/non-sedentary and inactive/sedentary phenotypes on obesity and metabolic health; and (ii) compare these relationships when using objective (accelerometer) total activity or subjective (self-report) leisure-time measures. Weighted associations for the metabolic syndrome (MetS), individual MetS components, 1+ disease (1 or more of diabetes, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular disease) and obesity were estimated using logistic regression. Results After adjustments, the odds (OR, 95% CI) of 1+ disease (OR = 3.05, 1.47–6.34) and abdominal obesity (OR = 2.75, 1.16–6.55) were higher in the inactive/sedentary group versus the referent group (OR = 1.00) when measured objectively. Within self-report leisure-time groups, elevated odds were observed for the inactive/sedentary group for MetS, obesity, abdominal obesity and elevated triglycerides. Inactive/non-sedentary and active/sedentary groups were similarly protective when measured by accelerometer. Conclusion Using accelerometer data, the inactive/sedentary group was at higher risk for 1+ disease and abdominal obesity only, whereas the active/sedentary and inactive/non-sedentary groups were not at higher risk for any health outcome.

URLhttps://academic.oup.com/jpubhealth/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/pubmed/fdy060/4961549
DOI10.1093/pubmed/fdy060
Document URLhttps://academic.oup.com/jpubhealth/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/pubmed/oup/backfile/content_public/journal/jpubhealth/pap/10.1093_pubmed_fdy060/1/fdy060.pdf