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Associations between sleep duration and indicators of cardiometabolic disease in Canadian children and adolescents: Analyses of the 2007-2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey

TitleAssociations between sleep duration and indicators of cardiometabolic disease in Canadian children and adolescents: Analyses of the 2007-2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsSluggett, L., Wagner S. L., Hardy C., and R. Harris L.
JournalChildhood Obesity
Volume12
Pages325 - 333
Date PublishedOctober
Abstract

Background: Indicators of cardiometabolic disease-including obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia-are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes in Canadian children and adolescents have increased rapidly in recent years; research exploring modifiable risk factors is critical. Experimental and epidemiological research demonstrates that partial sleep loss is linked with deteriorations in indicators of cardiometabolic health. The objectives of this study are (1) to examine associations between short sleep duration and indicators of cardiometabolic disease in Canadian children and adolescents and (2) to identify determinants of short sleep duration in this population. Methods: Logistic regression models were developed to examine associations between sleep duration and indicators of cardiometabolic disease and to identify predictors of short sleep duration. Results: Compared with longer sleepers, children and adolescents with short sleep duration had greater odds of being overweight or obese. Sex- and age-stratified analyses indicated that short sleep duration was linked with greater odds of overweight/obesity in boys and adolescents only. Short sleepers did not have greater odds of having hyperinsulinemia, low HDL cholesterol, or high triglycerides. Age was a strong predictor of inadequate sleep duration. Conclusion: Future studies should include longitudinal designs that address whether short sleep duration in boys and in adolescents contributes directly to the development of overweight and obesity.

URLhttp://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/chi.2015.0214
DOI10.1089/chi.2015.0214.
Document URLhttp://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdf/10.1089/chi.2015.0214