You are here

Are Indigenous determinants of health associated with self-reported health professional-diagnosed anxiety disorders among Canadian First Nations adults? Findings from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey

TitleAre Indigenous determinants of health associated with self-reported health professional-diagnosed anxiety disorders among Canadian First Nations adults? Findings from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsNasreen, S., Brar R., Brar S., Maltby A., and Wilk P.
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume54
Pages460 - 468
Keywordsanxiety disorders, canada, indigenous population
Abstract

We estimated the prevalence of self-reported health professional-diagnosed anxiety disorders among Canadian First Nations adults living off-reserve, and assessed the relationship between anxiety disorders and Indigenous determinants of health (Status Indian, residential school attendance, knowledge of Indigenous language, and participation in traditional activities) using the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed using bootstrap weights. The prevalence of anxiety disorders was 14.5% among off-reserve First Nations adults. There was an increased odds of anxiety disorders among those participating in traditional activities compared to their counterparts (aOR 1.46, 95% CI 1.12–1.90). No association was found between anxiety disorders and other Indigenous determinants of health. There is a high prevalence of self-reported anxiety among First Nations adults living off-reserve. However, further studies are warranted to identify and assess the role of Indigenous determinants of health for anxiety disorders and other prevalent mental health conditions in this population.

URLhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10597-017-0165-0
DOI10.1007/s10597-017-0165-0