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Aging and health: An examination of differences between older Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people

TitleAging and health: An examination of differences between older Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsWilson, K., Rosenberg M. W., Abonyi S., and Lovelace R.
JournalCanadian Journal on Aging / La Revue canadienne du vieillissement
Volume29
Pages369 - 382
Abstract

The Aboriginal population in Canada, much younger than the general population, has experienced a trend towards aging over the past decade. Using data from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the 2000/2001 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), this article examines differences in health status and the determinants of health and health care use between the 55-and-older Aboriginal population and non-Aboriginal population. The results show that the older Aboriginal population is unhealthier than the non-Aboriginal population across all age groups; differences in health status, however, appear to converge as age increases. Among those aged 55 to 64, 7 per cent of the Aboriginal population report three or more chronic conditions compared with 2 per cent of the non-Aboriginal population. Yet, among those aged 75 and older, 51 per cent of the Aboriginal population report three or more chronic conditions in comparison with 23 per cent of the non-Aboriginal population.

Document URLhttp://mtw160-150.ippl.jhu.edu/journals/canadian_journal_on_aging/v029/29.3.wilson.pdf