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Aboriginal peoples in complete mental health: A nationally-representative Canadian portrait of resilience and flourishing

TitleAboriginal peoples in complete mental health: A nationally-representative Canadian portrait of resilience and flourishing
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsFuller-Thomson, E., Lee S., Cameron R. E., Baiden P., Agbeyaka S., and Karamally T. M.
JournalTranscultural Psychiatry
Volume57
Pages250 - 262
Keywordsfirst nations, indigenous peoples, inuit, mental health, métis, resiliency
Abstract

This study aimed to document the prevalence and factors associated with complete mental health (CMH) among Aboriginal peoples living in Canada. CMH is comprised of three parts: 1) the absence of major depressive episode, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, serious suicidal thoughts, and substance dependence in the past year as measured by the World Health Organization (WHO) versions of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WHO-CIDI), 2) happiness and/or satisfaction with life in the past month, and 3) psychological and social well-being. The method involved secondary analysis of Statistics Canada's 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health (CCHS-MH). Responses from Aboriginal peoples living in Canada off-reserve (n = 965) were examined to determine what percentage were in CMH and what characteristics are associated with being in CMH. Data analysis involved both bivariate and multivariate analytic techniques to examine factors associated with CMH among Aboriginal peoples. Overall, two-thirds of Aboriginal peoples (67.9%) living in Canada were in CMH. Those with a post-secondary degree, who had a confidant, and those who were free of disabling chronic pain were more likely to be in CMH. Additionally, the odds of CMH were higher among those without a history of suicidal ideation, major depression, alcohol dependence, drug dependence, anxiety disorder, or difficulty sleeping. Findings from this study provide indications of substantial resiliency among Aboriginal peoples in Canada.

URLhttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1363461519885702
DOI10.1177%2F1363461519885702
Document URLhttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1363461519885702